ROANE COUNTY WORLD WAR I DEAD


BAILEY, Hobert McKinley

 

Private Hobart McKinley BAILEY.  The Record has been favored with the foll[ow]ing information in connection with the death in hospital of Private Hobart McKinley BAI LEY.  He was sent to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S.C., Sept. 4, 1918, and was placed in charge of the squad of 22 who were sent on that date because of his portly and commanding appearance.  His father and mother are Mr. and Mrs. Arthur BA ILEY of Clifty street, while a sister is Le ona BAILEY.  The following is the dispatch received announcing his death.  "Washington, D.C., November 21, 1918.  "Mr. Arthur BA ILEY, R.F.D. No. 2, Harriman, Tenn. "Deeply regret to inform you that it is officially reported that Private Hobart M. BAILEY, infantry, died of bronchial pneumonia, October 8th.  "HARRIS, Adjt. General."  Miss Le ona BAILEY, His sister, received the following from the Red Cross at Washington.  December 3, 1918.  "Miss Leona BAILEY, 805 Clifty street, Harriman, Tenn.  "My Dear Miss BAILEY: "It will comfort you we feel sure to know that we are today writing our Paris representative, asking all particulars concerning the death of your brother, Private Hobart M. BAI LEY, Col. I, 57th Pioneer Infantry.  A.E.F., France.  Upon receipt of an answer we shall write to you again, and to Mr. Arthur BAIL EY, R.F.D. No. 2, Harriman, Tenn., who has given us his emergency address.  We have on our files that your brother died of disease.  We assure you that everything was done to save his life; the doctors are skillful, and the nurses are kind.  When the end came he received a respectful burial and his grave was marked.  The Red Cross sympathizes with you, and with all to whom this young soldier was dear, and trusts that the memory of his bravery and devotion to duty may help them without him.  "Sincerely yours, "W.R. CA STLE, Jr."  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 19 Dec 1918, Vol. 53, No. 23.  See also, DUNAWAY, Fred L.

 

BOWMAN, Albert A.

 

BRANNAM (BRANMAN), Jesse – Buried Emory Gap Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Funeral of Jesse BRAN MAN.  Another Rockwood Hero Laid To Rest.  The impressive funeral service for Jesse BRANM AN, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. William BR ANMAN was conducted here Sunday under the auspices of the local post American Legion.  The Rev. L eland COOK conducted the services.  The body was interred in the Emory Gap cemetery.  Young BRANMAN was reported missing in action Oct. 24, 1918.  His death occurred four days later, the result of wounds.  The mother died about seven years ago.  The father now resides in Rockwood.  He is also survived by two brothers and two sisters.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 20 Oct 1921, Vol. 41, No. 37.

 

BROWN, Jennings –

 

Harriman Boy Killed In France.  Harriman, Tenn., Oct. 16.--A telegram was received this morning by J ames BROWN announcing that his brother, Jennings B ROWN, was killed in action in France.  Mr. BROWN enlisted here about a year ago.  He was a member of the famous 30th division.  He was a very genial young man and the news of his death has cast a shadow over the community.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 17 Oct 1918, Vol. 38, No. 42.

 

BRYANT, George W. -

 

BURCHFIELD, John Henry -

 

Wounds Prove Fatal.  Rockwood Boy Succumbs to Injuries Received on French Battlefields.  Mrs. Mary BIRC HFIELD received a message through the war department Tuesday that her son, Henry BIRCH FIELD, who two or three weeks ago had been reported seriously wounded in France, had died.  This is the second Rockwood boy to make the supreme sacrifice on the foreign battlefields.  Mr. BIRCHFIELD enlisted in the army from Michigan, where he had been living for several years.  He has a wife and two children residing in that state.  Before leaving Rockwood he was employed at the hosiery mills and had hosts of friends and many relatives in this section.  He had a ten-thousand dollar war insurance policy and this was made payable to his mother in this city.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 19 Sep 1918, Vol. 38, No. 38.  Nurse and Chaplain Write of Young Soldier's Death.  Mother of John BIR CHFIELD Told of the Last Hours of Her son in French Hospital.  Mrs. Mary E. BIRCHFI ELD has received letters from the Chaplain and one of the nurses in the hospital in France in which her son, Henry BI RCHFIELD, died of wounds on August 22.  The letters were quite a comfort to the young man's mother, as they gave in detail something of the death and burial of her son, and also set the treatment that is accorded our boys "over there" when overtaken by the grim results of battle.  The letter are as follows: 4, Place de la Concorde, Base Hospt. 34, Nantes, August 27th, 1918.  Mrs. Mary E. BIRCHF IELD, Rockwood, Tenn.  My Dear Mrs. BIRCHFIELD: The sad news of the death of your son, Private John BIRCHFIE LD, Battery E, 76th Field Artillery, in this hospital August 22nd, has already reached you.  I spent some time him the day before he died, as Hospital Visitor appointed by the Home Communication Service of the American Red Cross, and you will be consoled to know that he was resting quietly and without pain.  His skull had been fractured, and his condition was so serious that recovery was impossible, although he had the finest medical treatment and constant care and attention from devoted American nurses.  He was buried in the military cemetery near here.  The coffin was appropriately covered with the American flag and borne on a gun carriage.  After the chaplain had read the service, a squad of your son's comrades fired three salutes over the grave, and the bugle played taps.  There were French as well as American soldiers present to do honor to a brave man who had given his own life that others might live in security and freedom.  I am enclosing a flower as a keepsake for you, one which was among those that rested upon your son's coffin.  The grave is registered by the Graves Registration Bureau of the Army.  Please accept my very deepest sympathy for the loss of such a splendid boy, and believe me to be Yours most sincerely, Alice MAXWEL L, Appo. Home Communication Service, American Red Cross.  Base Hospital No. 34, U.S.A.  (Episcopal Hospital of Philadelphia), Nantes, France, Aug. 27, 1918.  My Dear Mrs. BIRCHFIELD: I write to tell you of the death of you son, Private John BIRCHFIE LD, Battery E, 76th F.A., in this hospital on the morning of August 22, 1918.  He passed into the life beyond at 8:25 a.m.  He had a severe gun shot wound in the head and was admitted to this hospital with a large cerebral hernia, causing paralysis.  The doctors and nurses did all in their power to help him, and we all watched with keen interest the splendid struggle he made.  Both Ch aplain GROTON and I saw him frequently.  The burial service of the Episcopal church was used on the afternoon of August 22, when we laid his body to rest in American Cemetery No. 88, Section B, Nantes.  The number of the grave is 49.  I assure you of my sympathy in your loss.  It will comfort you to know he gave his life as unselfishly as the other men who are giving their all for their country.  Yours faithfully, C.W. CLA SH.  Chaplain Base Hospital No. 34, Amer. E.F.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 17 Oct 1918, Vol. 38, No. 42.

 

BUTLER, Clarence –

 

Another Rockwood Boy Dies in France.  Mr. and Mrs. Isaac BUT LER of Postoak, received a message from the War Department yesterday apprising them of the death of their son, Cl arence BUTLER, in France.  The young man was killed early in August.  He did not enlist here, being a selectman from the state of Montana.  This family has two other sons in France, T illman and Wa llace BUTLER, who went as selectmen from Roane county.  The municipal flag on Rockwood avenue floated at half-mast yesterday out of respect for the death of young BUTLER.  A report was current today that several other Rockwood boys had been killed in the recent allied drives on the battle front, but so far no messages have been received announcing any further Rockwood casualties.  With the death of young BUTLER, Rockwood's total of killed reaches four.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 3 Oct 1918, Vol. 38, No. 40.   Tillma n and Clare nce BUTLER.  The bodies of Tillm an and Cl arence BUTLER arrived in Knoxville from overseas Saturday, August 13 and were buried Sunday, August 14 at 1:30 p.m. in the National Cemetery.  The funeral services were in charge of the American Legion.  It was sad to see these brothers lowered into the grave at once, yet we are glad that they sleep in the land they went forth to save, the land they gave their lives for.  Those at went from Rockwood to attend the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Isaac BUTL ER and family, Mrs. Flor ence BUTLER, Mr. and Mrs. Ed BE NSON, and Miss Alice B ENSON and Mr. WARN ER.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 18 Aug 1921, Vol. 41, No. 33.

 

BUTLER, Tillman -

 

Social and Personal Mention.  Rockwood people are extending sincere sympathy to the BUTLER family who reside near Postoak, in the loss of their son, Tillman BU TLER, in action.  This is the second son this family has given for the cause of democracy.  Til lman BUTLER was a member of the Rockwood company H, 119th infantry.  Saturday the large flag hung at half-mast telling that another Rockwood son had fallen for freedom.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 48.  A Mother's Darling Boy Paid the Price on the Battlefield.  Tillman BUTL ER, aged 26 years, 6 months and 22 days, met death on October 29, 1918.  He was a brave soldier and was always ready to help in anything that came up.  Everybody who knew Tillman always found him as their friend.  He lived only a short time, being in the army just one year.  He was drafted on December 10, 1917.  He spent 16 weeks at Camp Gordon and three weeks at Camp Upton on Long Island, then he sailed for France.  He had the good faith of one day coming home, but God saw something he could not stand and took him away.  He lacked thirteen days living until the war was over.  One sweet though he left behind him, was that if death should overtake him he was prepared to meet God in peace.  He was a good Christian boy.  He wrote his wife that he found the same Savior in the army that he did at home.  He has one other brother gone before that was killed between the 1st and 17th of August.  There were three in Uncle Sam's army, but there is only one left, and we can't say he's living today.  Everybody was so in hopes Tillman would return for he has experienced many things on his journey.  He leaves behind a young wife, a father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Isa ac BUTLER, six brothers and three sisters and many friends to mourn his death.  His face will always be missed wherever we go.  Dearest Tillman thou hast left us, And our loss we deeply feel; But 'tis God that has bereft us-- He can all our sorrows heal.  Yet again we hope to meet thee When the days of life are fled; When in Heaven with joy we greet thee Where no farewell tears are shed.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 5 Dec 1918, Vol. 38, No. 49.  Tillma n and Clare nce BUTLER.  The bodies of Tillm an and Cl arence BUTLER arrived in Knoxville from overseas Saturday, August 13 and were buried Sunday, August 14 at 1:30 p.m. in the National Cemetery.  The funeral services were in charge of the American Legion.  It was sad to see these brothers lowered into the grave at once, yet we are glad that they sleep in the land they went forth to save, the land they gave their lives for.  Those at went from Rockwood to attend the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Isaac BUTL ER and family, Mrs. Flor ence BUTLER, Mr. and Mrs. Ed BE NSON, and Miss Alice B ENSON and Mr. WARN ER.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 18 Aug 1921, Vol. 41, No. 33.

 

CARSON, Joseph H. –

 

Oliver Springs Boy Killed In Action.  Joseph H. CARSON, son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac CAR SON, who reside about one mile from Oliver Springs, was killed in action September 29, according to a telegram received by his parents stating that their son had fallen for freedom.  From what the writer can learn he was wounded in the head and lived about four hours.  Young CARSON was born June 2, 1893, was reared near Oliver Springs and has a large circle of friends who will regret to hear of his sad death.  We have not the language to express our touching regards, toward This young hero as he fell a victim on the French soil, so far from his earthly home and loved ones.  It seems hard to know that one who had fought to win the victory could not live to see it all.  But God knew best, and we are lead to believe that this brave hero has exchanged his uniform for the robes of immortality.  Young CARSON leaves a father and mother, three brothers and four sisters, a host of friends and relatives to mourn his loss.  Oh, Brother, were you home today, our joy would be untold.  And smile your sweetest smile again as in the days of old.  Oh, Brother, in the by-gone days, you were joyful, gay and free; Oh, could those days return, how happy we would be.  Sadly missed by his loved ones and friends.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 21 Nov 1918, Vol. 53, No. 18.

 

COKER, Ulys -

 

DAVIS, Joe Johnson -

 

Deaths.  Joe DAVIS Dies in France.  Yesterday W.H. DAV IS received notice of the death of his oldest son, Joe Johnson DA VIS, which occurred in a hospital in France, October 22, from pneumonia.  Mr. DAVIS was one of the men who were called to the service May 22.  From here he was sent to Camp Jackson and the first of July was sent to France.  He was 23 years old last Monday, November 18.  Besides his father Mr. DAVIS leaves two brothers, How ard, who is taking war mechanical training in Terre Haute, Ind., and Joh n, who is at home.  He leaves a grandmother, Mrs. J.D. MOON EY, who has been a mother to the boys since their mother died two years ago last May, an uncle, Will MO ONEY, and an aunt, Mrs. L.F. HORN ER, and cousin, Miss Anna Lynn HORN ER, who has always taken the part of a sister, besides several other relatives.  Joe was always a popular boy and has many friends in Harriman, who will be sorry to hear that he is not coming back now that the war is over.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 21 Nov 1918, Vol. 53, No. 18.  Harriman Boy Dead.  Harriman, Tenn., Nov. 25.--A telegram received by Wi lliam DAVIS announces the death of his son, Joe DA VIS, in France of bronchial pneumonia.  Mr. DAVIS was drafted in May and reached France in July.  He was prominent in athletic circles, having been physical director at Bowling Green collegeThe Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 48.  The name of Joe D AVIS, which appeared in Monday's paper as having died abroad, caused general sadness.  Mr. DAVIS is the son of Will DA VIS of the Southern railway, Harriman.  He was a prominent athlete having been a pitcher on the Harriman base ball team and a member of the Lenoir City team which won the East Tennessee league baseball championship.  He was well known locally as "Smoky" Joe DAV IS.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 48.  The Funeral Of Joe Johnson DAVI S.  The funeral over the remains of Joe Johnson DAVI S, aged 22 years and 1 months, who died in a hospital 1918 in France, October 22nd, was from bronchial pneumonia, was held at the Presbyterian church Monday afternoon, Rev. M.L. CLE MENS conducting the services.  Mr. CLEMENS preached a timely sermon from the text "Then therefore enduring the hardness as a good soldier of Jesus Christ," 2nd Tim. 2-3.  Excellent music was furnished by a quartette who sang Lead [torn] Light, Come Ye Disconsolate and [torn] With Me.  By request Frank VANKEU REN sang, "When The Little(?) Star Turns To Gold,"  Mrs. ENGLA ND organist.  The pall bearers, former soldiers, dressed in uniform were Messrs. H.C. BU NCH, Charles S. HORNSB Y, Oliver FRENC H, Will NE WTON, Lut her LONG and Leo nard McKINNEY.  The casket, covered with flowers, was taken to his old home and early Tuesday morning accompanied by his father, two brothers and other relatives were taken to Whiteside and buried beside his mother.  Joe DA VIS was the oldest son of Mr. and the late Mrs. W.H. DAV IS.  His early life was spent in Harriman where he attended school and was a regular attendant at the Presbyterian church and Sunday School and was converted in early life.  From the Harriman school he went to Bowling Green, Ky., normal school, but left before graduating to enter the service of the Inter-State Commerce Commission and was called from that service to the service of his country.  He left Harriman May 24, 1918, and sailed from New York for France July 10.  Upon reaching France he was assigned to truck service where he remained until taken sick and was sent to the hospital where he died.  The name of Mr. DAVIS with twelve other I.C.C. boys has been placed on a tablet in the Inter-State Commerce Commission building at Washton.  Mr. DAVIS is survived by his father, W.H. DA VIS, two brothers, Ho ward and J ohn, his grandmother, Mrs. J.D. MO ONEY, besides other relatives and a large circle of friends.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 13 Jan 1921, Vol. 55, No. 21.

 

 

 

DOUGLAS, Arthur Bryant – Buried Odd Fellows Cemetery, Roane County, TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

DOUGLAS

Arthur B.

25 Nov 1899

19 Jul 1918

Ala Pvt Co. G 26 Inf 1 Div WW I PH

 

Is Killed In Action.  Parents of Arthur DOUGLASS so Notified by War Department.  Arthur DO UGLASS , an ord Rockwood boy, who was some months ago reported as missing in action in France, has been officially reported  as killed in action.  The telegram bearing this news came to the young man's parents here Tuesday, and is as follows:  "Washington, Dec. 3, S.E. DO UGLASS, Rockwood, Tenn.  Deeply regret to inform you that Private A.B. DOUGLA SS, infantry, previously reported as missing in action since July 19, now reported as missing in action since July 19, now reported as killed in action about same date.  Harris, Acting Adjt. Gen.  Young DOUGLASS was a volunteer and was only about 18 years of age.  He left Rockwood about fourteen months ago, going to Chattanooga.  From there he went to Birmingham, where he enlisted.  He wrote his parents that he had a fine position in Birmingham, but that he realized that his country needed him and that he intended to enlist.  For a time after his enlistment he was in a hospital but shortly after being released was sent overseas.  He saw active service and was in some of the thickest of the fighting.  Along in the summer he was reported as missing in action, and since that time his parents have suffered a great deal of anxiety.  It is stated that a resident of the mountain section received two weeks ago a letter from a relative in France and in this letter the writer stated that young DOUGLASS was killed, as he was close by his side when the shell which took his life exploded.  However, the war department did not furnish the information until this week.  The young man had many friends here who will be pained to learn of his death.  The large municipal flag on Rockwood avenue hung at half-mast yesterday out of respect to the memory of the young soldier.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 5 Dec 1918, Vol. 38, No. 49.  Missing In Action.  Arthur DOUGLASS, Rockwood Boy, Not Heard of Since July 19.  Arthur DOUGLA SS, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam DOUG LASS, who was well known to many people in Rockwood, is reported as missing in action in France since July 19th.  Young DOUGLASS left Rockwood over a year ago, going to Chattanooga.  From there he went to Birmingham, where he enlisted.  "Missing in action" may mean several things.  The soldier may be a prisoner, he may have been struck by a large shell and blown to pieces, or he may have become separated from his command.  It some times takes several months to clear up the history of a soldier reported as missing in action.  Frequently they are located in hospitals.  The telegram to Mrs. DOUGLASS from the war department is as follows: No. 6 Og 36 Govt. WA Washington, D.C. 24.  Mr. Sam E. DOUG LASS, Rockwood, Tenn.  Deeply regret to inform you that Private Arthur DOUGLA SS, infantry, is officially reported as missing in action since July nineteenth.  Will report first information received.  Harris The adjt. genl. 2:10 PM.  Arthur DOUGLA SS was 18 years of age and was a member of the Co. G, 26th U.S. Infantry.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 31 Oct 1918, Vol. 38, No. 44.  Arthur DOUGLASS Reported As Still Missing By The Red Cross.  Sam DOUGLAS S this week received a letter from the Red Cross operating on the western battle front in which the information is given that no word has been received from his son, Arthur DOUGLAS S, who is reported in the American casualty lists as missing in action.  The letter to Mr. DOUGLASS is as follows:  October 31, 1918.  My Dear Mr. DOUGLASS: The American Red Cross sends most sincere sympathy to you in your anxiety, and wishes to assure you that when a man is officially reported missing, every avenue of information is used in order to trace him.  This work is begun automatically by the Red Cross as soon as a man's name appears on the list of missing.  Men who were in the engagement with him are questioned, to find out if possible from eye witnesses what may have happened to him.  Inquiries are made at the hospitals, and behind the German lines through the International Red Cross to see if he has been taken prisoner.  Germany is extremely slow in giving out prisoner reports, and we must therefore, ask you to be as patient as possible in spite of your great anxiety, feeling that nothing is being left undone in order to obtain definite information of him, which will be forwarded to you immediately.  Sincerely yours, W.R. SAS TLE, Jr. Director.  By L.B.C.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 7 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 45.  Another War Hero Laid To Rest Sunday.  Arthur DOUGLA SS Buried With Full Military Honors.  All Rockwood paused last Sunday to pay tribute to another one of her boys, who made the supreme sacrifice on the battlefield of France, when the body of Arthur DO UGLAS was laid in its final resting place with full military honors by the local post of the American Legion.  Private Arthur Bryant DOUG LAS was one of the youngest of Rockwood's soldiers and his record is one of which even the oldest would well be proud to boast.  He was a member of Co. G. 26th Infantry of the First Division, and also fought with the famous 42nd, (Rainbow) Division.  With four other major engagements to his credit he went into his fifth and on the fifth day of the battle of Soissons was killed.  He lacked one day of being in the service eight months.  Arthur was born in Woodward, Ala. Nov. 25th, 1899, coming to Rockwood at the age of fifteen.  He was employed by the Roane Iron Company here and was thought very highly of by both his employers and co-workers because of his willingness and faithfulness to his work.  The funeral was held at the First Presbyterian Church, by Rev. J.C. O RR.  Interment followed in the Odd Fellows cemetery.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 9 Mar 1922, Vol. 42, No. 10.

 

DUNAWAY, Fred L. -

 

Harriman Boys Pay the Great Price.  Three Are Reported Among Those Who Will Not Answer the Last Roll Call.  Harriman has been extremely fortunate in that her boys who had gone over seas had not been stricken with death.  This was true up to a few days ago.  Now the story takes a turn and it is necessary to name three who paid all at the shrine of duty.  Fred L. D UNAWAY of Walnut Hill, a brother of F.W. DUNAW AY, was reported as among the killed but his address was given as Harrison and not Harriman.  We have no positive information concerning the young man.  Taylor S. STO NE, who enlisted from Knoxville and who has a sister, Mrs. George McDANIE LS, living on Clinton street, was killed in action October 7 as Mrs. DANIELS was informed by wire.  Private Stone was a widower and when he enlisted at Knoxville, where he had been working for a time after leaving Harriman, he sent a young daughter to live with his sister in Harriman, who is now living with Mrs. McDANIELS.  Hobart BAIL EY died in hospital in France of disease.  His sister, Miss Leona BA ILEY, who lives with her father, Arthur BA ILEY, on Clinch street, received the information of his death through the Red Cross.  Hobart was 22 years of age and enlisted in the Harriman company early after the declaration of war.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 19 Dec 1918, Vol. 53, No. 23.   Fred L. DUNAW AY Paid the Price In France.  First Lieutenant Lee CAS TLE Writes Fielder W. DUNNA WAY the Account of the Death of His Brother.  Private Fred L. DU NAWAY, who was killed in action in France, October 31, 1918, was born at Edgemore, Tenn.  After the death of his father, Wayne W. DUNA WAY, he made his home with his brother, F.W. DUNAW AY, who lives in Harriman.  Another brother, Floyd DUNAWA Y, lives at Knoxville.  Fred DU NAWAY was born July 17, 1895.  He left home November 13, 1917, in the second national call.  He was a member of the Methodist church at Dunaway Chapel, where he was born and where he is well known.  Fred L. DUNA WAY of South Harriman enlisted in the regular army and was sent to France and was serving in the 37th Div., 74tr Brig., 148th Reg., Co. E, Infantry when he was in the battle of October 18th in Belgium and was killed on that day.  The report of the action and the supreme sacrifice of this one of Harriman's boys is given in the letter of his Lieutenant to Field DUN NAWAY under date of January 31st as follows:  American Expeditionary Force, January 30, 1919.  Mr. Fielder W. DU NAWAY, Harriman, Tenn.  Dear Sir:--Your letter of December 6th I received today.  In answer: Your brother was in the 37th Division, 74th Brigade and in my company, Co. E, 148th Infantry.  When our division came out from the St. Mihiel sector on October 18, 1918, we received some replacements (soldiers to replace those killed and wounded) from the 86th Division.  Your brother was among those assigned to my company.  That was at Pannes, France.  We were sent from there to Belgium to help the French there.  On the morning of October 31, 1918, after a five minute barrage we went "over the top" at Olsene, Belgium.  Companies E and F of our regiment were in the front line and your brother Fred was in the first wave. During all my fighting over here that morning was the worst I have seen and I lost many of my boys that day.  The place was full of German machine guns and they were fighting hard to hold their position, as it meant a complete smash of their line in Belgium if we broke through.  There were two machine guns on our left flank that were causing me heavy losses and I sent eight men out to capture them, which they did.  Your brother killed two Germans in the first machine gun nest, single handed, with his bayonet, but he was killed by the other gun as they were attacking it.  It happened at about 9 o'clock in the morning.  He suffered none, as he was killed instantly, shot through the head.  Mr. DUNAWAY, you may be truly proud that you have had such a brother and I pay him the highest compliment an officer can, when I say, "He was a true American soldier."  Your brother is buried near OlseneOlsene is on the Lye river about five miles southeast of Deyuze.  You can find Deyuze on a map of Belgium.  All graves of American solders are well taken care of over here and I think that later on all of the boys's bodies will be brought back to the United States.  Personal belonging taken from those who were killed have been kept and will be sent back to the nearest relative as soon as possible.  So you will receive those later.  These things are taken care of by the chaplain of the regiment.  I was reading a piece by James HOPPE R today and I think it is a good article.  He says after passing over the battlefield, "All our boys lay stretched exactly in the same direction as if they by some mysterious magnetic current they had been pointed toward some spiritual pole--the pole of their avenging purpose.  They lay stretched exactly in the line of the advance, head towards the foe, their bodies still beautiful and lithe, while the Germans were in huddles at the bottom of shell holes.  That is how our world was made free, and we must never forget it."  I am quite sure that our division will be sent back to the States next month.  We will probably be mustered out in Ohio, as the 37th is an Ohio division.  If you care to know any more about your brother or any questions you care to ask me I will deem it privilege to answer your letters.  After I am mustered out my address will be at South Shaftsbury, Vermont, so it will be better if you address me ThereYours very truly, 1st Lt. Lee CA STLE, Co. E., 148th Inf., A.P.O. 763, Am. E.F., France.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 3 Apr 1919, Vol. 53, No. 38.

 

EVANS, Joe H. – Odd Fellows Cemetery, Roane Co., TN

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

EVANS

Joe H.

 

18 Aug 1918

TN Pvt 119 Inf 30 Div

 

Third Rockwood Boy Pays the Price.  With His Life at the Front Far Away France.  John H. (sic – should be Joe H.) E VANS, of the 119th Infantry, who was a member of the Co. H which left Rockwood for camp last September, is one of the latest reported of the boys who have paid the great price in France.  He was a son of Sal ly EVANS of Rockwood.  Another Rockwood boy was reported Monday night as having died of his wounds in France, His having been wounded was reported last week.  He was a son of Mary BURC HFIELD of Rockwood.  He enlisted in the regular army in Michigan.  His mother had not heard from her son for several years until she was wired from Washington that he was seriously wounded and that he had given as nearest of kin.  The mother received the news of his death from his wounds before it was published.  He left her the limit of allowance of life insurance of $10,000.  So far Harriman boys have escaped severe injury at the front in France.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 26 Sep 1918, Vol. 53, No. 11. 

 

GALYON, Charley –

 

Two More Casualties.  Rockwood's municipal flag floats at half-mast today for two more Roane county boys who have made the supreme sacrifice.  Oscar HAMP TON and Chas. GAL YON have been reported as dying on the battlefields of France.  HAMPTON was a member of the old Rockwood company, while GALYON enlisted at Lenoir City.  Another Roane county boy, Joe DA VIS of Harriman has been reported as dying of bronchial pneumonia.  Many Rockwood people will remember DAVIS, as he often came here to play baseball.  Roane has given her share of the toll for world-wide democracy.   The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 48.

 

GRAVES, Charley W. –

 

HAMPTON, Oscar –

 

Two More Casualties.  Rockwood's municipal flag floats at half-mast today for two more Roane county boys who have made the supreme sacrifice.  Oscar HAMP TON and Chas. GAL YON have been reported as dying on the battlefields of France.  HAMPTON was a member of the old Rockwood company, while GALYON enlisted at Lenoir City.  Another Roane county boy, Joe DA VIS of Harriman has been reported as dying of bronchial pneumonia.  Many Rockwood people will remember DAVIS, as he often came here to play baseball.  Roane has given her share of the toll for world-wide democracy.   The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Nov 1918, Vol. 38, No. 48.

 

HICKEY, Edward H. –

 

JONES, Joseph T. –

 

McCLURE, George -

 

McKINNEY, Edgar L. – Buried Willard Park Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

McKINNEY

Edgar L.

05 Dec 1894

01 Oct 1918

 

 

Edgar L. McKIN NEY Buried With Honors.  Edgar L. McKINN EY, 23 years of age, of Swan Pond, this county, died in France Oct. 1, 1918.  He was a soldier in the American army and had been in France a few days when death came by sickness.  The body was shipped from France and arrived in Harriman, Friday the 7th.  The funeral was conducted at the Swan Pond Methodist Church, Sunday afternoon by Rev. James GODD ARD, pastor Tip Top Baptist Church.  Mr. McKINNEY had been a member of the Baptist church since 1914, was also a member of the I.O.O.F., this city.  About one thousand people attended the funeral.  At the grave the Odd Fellows took charge and rendered the beautiful service of that fraternity, then the local members of the American legion clad in uniform under the command of Capt. BU NCH, paid the last honors to their fallen comrade and hero.  After the firing of the guns, taps were sounded, and the clods of the valley covered his body to await the sounding of the last trump.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 13 May 1920, Vol. 54, No. 39.

 

MEE, Mounterville (Monterville) – Swan Pond Methodist Church Cemetery, Roane Co., TN

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

MEE

Monterville

22 Apr 1901

08 Jan 1918

s/o D.K.& S.A.; “In memory of our soldier boy”

 

NEWMAN, Ralph B. – Harriman Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

NEWMAN

Ralph B. (Pvt.)

25 Jan 1895

27 Feb 1919

Adv.-AN-TR-Dept. Sec.-B-GR-1584- Died in Gievres, France

 

OOTEN, Sam – may be buried Citizens Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Colored Notes.  The remains of Sam WOO TEN (sic), who died Tuesday, Oct. 8, at Camp Sherman, Ohio, arrived here Thursday evening and the funeral services were held from the residence of his sister, Mrs. Nellie EW ING, Friday afternoon with Rev. J.M. E RVIN officiating.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 17 Oct 1918, Vol. 38, No. 42.

 

PITMAN, Daniel –

 

RAYBURN, John J. – Poplar Springs Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

RAYBURN

John J.

28 May 1895

18 Feb 1919

Pvt. Battery D 12th F.A.

 

RENFRO, Will W. – Willard Park Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

RENFRO

W.W.

18 Mar 1890

10 Jul 1918

Died in line of duty

 

Harriman's Dead Hero.  Funeral of Private RENFRO, Killed at Gerstner Field.  The wheels of Harriman's industries were stilled and every business house in that city closed its doors for two hours Saturday afternoon to pay the last tribute to William Wright REN FRO, 29, aero squadron 253, Lake Charles, La.  Young RENFRO was an expert motor mechanic and it was while testing an airplane motor that his death occurred, being caused by a blow on the head from an airplane propeller while at work at Gerstner field Wednesday afternoon.  Application papers had been filed for RENFRO to become a flyer.  The body, accompanied by his "bunkie," Sergt. Francis L. KELSEY, arrived Friday.  Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 3 from the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. RENF RO, and was attended by a large concourse from over the county.  The Rev. E.E. WILE Y, of Chattanooga, a former pastor of the deceased, assisted by the Rev. D.O. HER RON, pastor of the M.E. church, south, conducted the services.  The floral offerings were beautiful, and noticeable among them was a large American flag composed of flowers in the national colors.  The flag-draped coffin was accompanied to Willard Park cemetery by a squad of soldiers, members of the local company I, Fifth Tennessee infantry, commanded by Sergt. KELS EY.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 18 Jul 1918, Vol. 38, No. 29.

 

ROBINSON, Marion A. – Buried Paint Rock Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

ROBINSON

Marion A.

27 Nov 1890

03 Oct 1918

Pvt. 22nd Co. 6th TR BN 157th  DB

 

Kingston Department.  Deaths.  Roane County Gives Up Her Sons.  Whenever death comes to our boys wearing with honor the uniform of the army of the United States just as truly as they heroes as those who fall by Hun bullets.  We bow our heads in sorrow with the parents of these two boys, with them we share the glory of their death.  The body of Elbert W OODY, son of attorney Bry ce WOODY of this County, arrived in Loudon Monday and was interred Tuesday at Paint Rock.  Elbert WO ODY died in Hoboken N.Y., of influenza followed by pneumonia.  The young man was in the army and ready for overseas service.  Marion ROBIN SON, son of Sam RO BINSON of the South Side, at sea, of pneumonia.  The body was brought to New York, and will be shipped here for burial.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 17 Oct 1918, Vol. 53, No. 14.

 

SMITH, Curtis E. – Buried Oak Grove Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

SMITH

Curtis E.

1895

1918

1st Sgt., Killed at Ypres, Belgium

 

Sergt. Curtis SMITH Killed In Action on French Battlefields.  The great world war has been brought right to the doors of the people of Rockwood by the announcement from Washington Monday evening that Sergt. Curtis E. SM ITH had been killed in action on Wednesday, July 17.  This is the third Roane county boy to fall on the battlefields of France, the other being Private WE ST of Oliver Springs.  Sergt. Curtis E. SM ITH was one of Rockwood's most popular young men.  When Company H was organized here he enlisted and was made first sergeant of the company.  After our boys reached camp Sevier the company was divided, and a number of the officers were given over to other commands.  Some weeks ago Sergt. SMITH sailed out for the front and it was quite a while before his parents, Mr. and Mrs. S.D. SM ITH received any word of his arrival overseas, and there was considerable anxiety felt for his safety, owing to the fact that submarines were quite active during that period, and it was feared perhaps his transport had been sunk by one of them.  Finally, however, word came that the sergeant had landed safely, and his relatives were much relieved.  Letters have come at intervals since that time, but owing  to the fact that the Americans have been in the thickest of the fighting for the past two or three weeks, the absence of word from the sergeant was taken as a matter of course and there was no indication but that all was well with him until the telegram came to S.D. SMITH Monday evening that his son had met death while facing the enemy on July 17.  No details of his death were given in the message, only the bare fact that he had been killed being stated.  At the time of the battle in which the young man was killed Sergt. SMITH was attached to Co. D, 119th Infantry, 30th Division.  It has been stated in newspaper reports from the front that the 30th was in the hottest of the fighting, consequently Mr. and Mrs. SMITH were aware that their son was more than likely subjected to the gravest dangers.  The announcement of the young man's death cast a pall of gloom over Rockwood.  He was known by everyone here, and was immensely popular.  Death loves a shining mark, and the old proverb has been aptly proven in the taking away of this young man.  He was the eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. S.D. SMIT H, being at the time of the death about 23 years of age.  When he enlisted he gave up a very promising business career and prospects for a very successful business life.  Sergt. SMITH has two brothers in the service, G ene and Cap S MITH, who enlisted in the marines in Chattanooga a couple of weeks ago.  They are now in training at Paris Island, S.C.  As a tribute to the memory of the young man every business house in the city was closed from 12 until 2 o'clock Tuesday and the flag on Rockwood avenue was placed at half-mast.  Every citizen realizes the loss of this most excellent young man and all were eager and anxious to pay homage to his memory.  Card of Thanks.  We wish to express to our many friends of Rockwood and vicinity out appreciation of the many kindness shown us during our present bereavement in the loss of our dear boy.  Mr. and Mrs. S.D. SMIT H and daughter, IlaThe Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 1 Aug 1918, Vol. 38, No. 31.  Killed In Second Line Trenches.  Additional Details Regarding Death of Sergt. Curtis SM ITH.  S.D. SMIT H on Saturday received a letter from Capt. T.A. WRI GHT who was with Sergt. SMITH at the time he was killed.  In the letter Capt. WRIGHT states that the Sergeant and a number of other men were in the second line trenches when a shell bursted overhead and a piece of shrapnel struck Sergt. SMITH resulting in his death.  The Captain was writing a letter to Rockwood relatives at the time Sergt. SMITH was killed but in this he simply stated the fact of the young officers' death, saying that he presumed the family would get the details through the war department before his letter was received.  In the letter to Mr. SMITH Capt. WRIGHT stated that he had just returned from the funeral and burial of the Rockwood boy, and that the grave had been marked in a manner that he could easily identify it in case he came through the war with his life.  The body was given the usual military burial and the obsequies were attended by a large number of the soldier friends of the young officer.  The manner in which Sergt. SMITH met death has made it harder for his family and friends here.  It was the first remark of Mr. SMITH that if he only knew that his boy had a chance at the enemy and had been able to sell his life dearly to the huns the shock would be softened to some extent.  It is hoped that within a week or two all the details connected with his death may be obtainable.  At the Christian church Sunday the first gold star placed in a local service flag was noticeable.  This signifies the death of one of the young men going out from that church, and it made everyone present sad.  C urtis SMITH was one of the best loved of the many young men who have gone to the service from Rockwood, and his death in action was a shock to everyone.  It is yet hard to realize that he will be among those who will never come back, but this may be taken as one of possibly a number of similar instances that may be looked for with reference to others of our boys over there.  War is a grim business, and where it is in full sway as it has been in France lately large casualty lists may be looked for.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 8 Aug 1918, Vol. 38, No. 32.  Body of Curtis E. SM ITH Reaches American Shore.  No Information As to When It Will Reach Rockwood--Legion in Charge.  Mr. and Mrs. S.D. SM ITH, who was killed in France during the World War, has been received at Hoboken, N.J.  The message announcing the arrival of the body stated that further information would be sent as to the forwarding of the body to Rockwood, but up to the time of going to press the parents of the young man had no further word from the officials.  Sergeant SMITH was the first volunteer in the Rockwood company.  He was also the first Rockwood boy to be killed in action.  The local American Legion Post, which was named in honor of Sergeant SMITH, will have charge of the funeral and burial when the body reaches Rockwood, and the day will be a memorial to the soldier dead.  Curtis E. S MITH was one of the most popular boys in Rockwood, and when the casualty lists contained his name among the dead it brought sorrow to the hearts of everyone.  As stated, it is not known at this time when the body will reach home, but the day will be one of sorrow for all, and the funeral will draw no doubt the largest assemblage ever seen in the city on a similar occasion.  Mr. and Mrs. SMITH have been awaiting definite information since the first message was received, but further than the bare announcement that the body had reached Hoboken, nothing further has been heard from the war department.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 14 Apr 1921, Vol. 41, No. 15.  Rockwood Pays Tribute To Home Boys Who Made Supreme Sacrifice Abroad.  Rockwood and Roane County citizens as well as hundreds from other counties paid tribute Sunday afternoon to the memory of Sgt. Curtis E. SMI TH, whose body reached the city Saturday morning of last week.  The body came in on an early train from the north and was escorted by members of the Curtis E. SMITH post, American Legion, to the SMITH residence on Kingston avenue.  Here it remained under guard until the time for the funeral, 2 p.m. Sunday afternoon.  More than 100 ex-service men, many of them in overseas uniforms, marked to the home shortly before two and acted as an escort to the body in the march to the church.  The soldiers were under the command of Capt. Asbury WRI GHT of Knoxville, and Capt. R.H. TH OMPSON of Rockwood. The large auditorium at the Christian church was wholly inadequate to seat the large crowd, and hundreds were not able to gain entrance.  The music for the occasion was furnished by a double mixed quartette, composed of Misses Dorothy TARW ATER, Lenice IN GRAM, Lois PARKS, and Thelma MI LLICAN and Messrs. AC UFF, OW INGS, DAUGH TERY and M EE.  Following the processional, "Rock of Ages" was rendered in a very touching manner.  Then came the devotions by Dr. CO OK, pastor of the church and chaplain of the Curtis E. SMIT H post, American Legion, under whose auspices the services were held.  Dr. COOK then delivered the sermon.  He spoke in touching terms of the life of the young soldier among his home people and the gallant manner in which he answered the first call "to arms," he being the first Rockwood boy to volunteer when the formation of Company H, known as the "Rockwood Company" was started.  The immense audience sat almost breathless during Dr. CO OK's sermon, and many minds no doubt, went back to the days before the great world conflict when Curtis SMITH was a familiar figure upon the streets of Rockwood.  Dr. COOK, was followed by Dr. W.P. SH AMHART of Greenville, N.C., a former Rockwood pastor, who delivered a beautiful eulogy to the dead sergeant.  The rendering of "Abide with Me," by the quartette concluded the services at the church.  The funeral procession was fully a mile long, nearly 100 cars being in line, and hundreds walked to the cemetery.  Here the Legion was in full charge.  Edw ard HALTOM sounded "taps" the final salute of three volleys was fired and the mortal remains of the war hero were lowered in the grave.  The mound was banked with floral offerings of many and beautiful designs.  It was the prettiest array of flowers ever seen in Rockwood and the funeral was the largest ever witnessed here.  Sgt. SMITH was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. S.D. SM ITH of this city.  He was the first volunteer in the Rockwood company, being only 22 years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was born Oct. 10, 1895, enlisted in May, 1918, and was killed in Belgium on July 17, 1918.  Sgt. SMITH was one of the most popular boys in Rockwood and when his name appeared in the casualty lists during the darkest days of the war, it brought sorrow to the hearts of hundreds of friends in his old home town.  The large funeral Sunday attested his popularity at home and also showed the appreciation felt by hundreds of others for the brave manner in which he faced the enemy fire and gave all that he possessed--his life--for his country and friends.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 28 Apr 1921, Vol. 41, No. 17.

 

STEGALL, Clifford T. – Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

STEGALL

Clifford T.

10 Feb 1899

28 Oct 1918

“Served with honor in the World War and died in service of his country.”

 

Died of Wounds.  Clifford STE GALL of Southside, Among Army Casualties.  In the army casualty list Saturday appeared the name Clifford STE GALL as among those who had died from wounds received in battle.  He was the youngest son of the late Dr. ST EGALL and wife of the southside, and a brother of Walter STE GALL of Harriman and Mrs. Elmer PRIFFIT T this city.  Young STEGALL enlisted in the Harriman company, if our information is correct, and had been in France several months.  Some weeks ago his mother was advised that he had been wounded in the hand and was in a hospital.  This letter was written by one of the nurses, and stated that he was getting along nicely and would probably soon be out.  The later announcement of his death was a great shock to the young man's relatives and many friends in the county.  Roane county has paid her full quota with the lives of her young men in the winning of the great world war.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 12 Dec 1918, Vol. 38, No. 50.  Local and Personal.  Mr. and Mrs. Elmer PROFF ITT spent Sunday at the Stegall home on the South Side, where they attended the funeral and interment of Clifford S TEGALL, a brother of Mrs. PROFFITT, who was killed in France during the world war.  The funeral was largely attended by persons from all sections of the county.  The Rockwood Times, Thursday, 30 Sep 1920, Vol. 40, No. 40.  Deaths.  Clifford S TEGALL.  The body of Clifford STEGALL, who was killed in France during the world war, will reach here Sunday.  The funeral services will be held at the home South of the Tennessee river.  Clifford was the youngest member of his family and the first to enlist when the call to arms came.  He enlisted in the Harriman Company under Capt. BUNC H and was in several battles, serving with the glorious 30th Division.   He was wounded in battle on October 14th, his death occurring fourteen days later in a hospital in France.   He has two brothers living in Harriman, Messrs. W.A. and J.W. STE GA LL.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 23 Sep 1920, Vol. 55, No. 6.

 

TEETER, Harvey S. -

 

WALLING, Reuben Roy -

 

WEST, George E. - Oliver Springs Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

WEST

George E.

21 Mar 1898

19 Jul 1918

Killed Soissons – France; Enl. April 12, 1917 Co. E, 16 Inf. First Div.

 

Give Two Sons For Liberty.  Mr. and Mrs. Ed. WE ST of Oliver Springs Have This Distinction.  Mr. and Mrs. Ed. WES T of Oliver Springs have received official notice from the war department that their eldest son, George WE ST, was killed several days ago on the Marne battle front in France.  Some weeks ago they were notified of the death in action of their other son, who was just 17 years of age.  Both boys were volunteers.  At the time of the wounding of the younger son, G eorge WEST accidentally stumbled into a shell hole on the French battlefield and there found his younger brother dying from a shrapnel wound.  Despite the fact that the firing was terrible the elder boy carried his brother back to the rear where his wounds were given attention in an emergency hospital.  However, he died a few days later.  Mr. and Mrs. WEST have given both of their sons in the world battle for freedom.  They have received the sympathy of the entire county during the trying hourse which have come to them by reason of the great sacrifice which they and their boys have been called upon to make.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 15 Aug 1918, Vol. 38, No. 33.

 

WEST, Tom R. – Oliver Springs Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

WEST

Tom R.

17 Nov 1900

29 May 1918

Killed Cantigny – France; Enl. Mar. 30, 1917 Co. C, 28 Inf. First Div.

 

Oliver Springs.  Friends will learn with regret, the sad news of Tom WE ST who was killed in France May 29.  News was received here June 25th by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed WE ST of this place.  The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 27 Jun 1918, Vol. 38, No. 26.

 

WILSON, David H. -

 

WOODY, Elbert J. – Tennessee Chapel Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

WOODY

Elbert J.

19 Apr 1888

10 Oct 1918

Pvt. Supply Co. 333 Q.M.C., War of 1914-18

 

Kingston Department.  Deaths.  Roane County Gives Up Her Sons.  Whenever death comes to our boys wearing with honor the uniform of the army of the United States just as truly as they heroes as those who fall by Hun bullets.  We bow our heads in sorrow with the parents of these two boys, with them we share the glory of their death.  The body of Elbert W OODY, son of attorney Bry ce WOODY of this County, arrived in Loudon Monday and was interred Tuesday at Paint Rock.  Elbert WO ODY died in Hoboken N.Y., of influenza followed by pneumonia.  The young man was in the army and ready for overseas service.  Marion ROBIN SON, son of Sam RO BINSON of the South Side, at sea, of pneumonia.  The body was brought to New York, and will be shipped here for burial.  The Harriman Record, Thursday, 17 Oct 1918, Vol. 53, No. 14.

 

WRIGHT, James Y. – Poplar Springs Cemetery, Roane Co., TN.

 

Surname

First Name

Birth Date

Death Date

Remarks

WRIGHT

James Y.

19 Dec 1890

17 Oct 1918

Pvt. Co. 11, Died in France