Marriages and Births  From Roane County Papers  1900-1906  
Compiled by Robert L. Bailey

The East Tennessean, Kingston, Saturday, 8 Sep 1900, Vol. 35, No. 6.

Mrs. J.M. MOSIER of Wheat is visiting her daughter, Mrs. W.A. COLLINS.

M.O. WALLER, of Dayton, is spending a few days in Kingston, the guest of his sister, Mrs. B.F. BROWN.

At 9 o'clock Wednesday night Rev. Hazen Oaks pronounced Mr. H.A. BLACK, of Atlanta, and Miss Belle WILSON, of Rockwood, husband and wife.  The wedding occured on the lawn of Martin residence in Kingston.  The newly married couple immediately returned to Rockwood and are at the Mourfield Hotel temporarily.  The many friends of the charming bride wish her much joy.

Oliver KITTRELL, son of our townsman, Robert KITTRELL, s visiting his grandmother, Mrs. KITTRELL in Loudon county.  Mrs. KITTRELL is 76 years old, and one of Loudon county's most highly esteemed and respected.

A pretty home wedding was the marriage Thursday afternoon of Will TIPTON and Miss Johanna WILSON, at the residence of the bride, two miles east of Kingston.  Justice J.G. CRUMBLISS performed the ceremony.  The bride and groom are both well known and they have the best wishes of many friends for a long and happy life.

Mrs. F.A. ROBERTS, of Chattanooga, is visiting at the home of her brother, W.H. FRITTS.

BUSH TOWN ITEMS: Miss Lillie SIMS of Chattanooga, has been visiting her sister, Mrs. MORROWS, returned home last Sunday.

The East Tennessean, Kingston, Saturday, 3 Nov 1900, Vol. 35, No. 14.

S.A. BREAZEALE and sister, Miss Mai, were visiting in Harriman Thursday.

Mr. and Mrs. H. CRUMBLISS are in Jasper visiting her daughters, Mrs. A.L. ROBERSON.

Among the lucky parties to receive increase in pensions are M.F. MILLICAN, Rockwood, $24; Mary A. HESTER, Kreis, $8; Christian MILLER, Harriman $10; Calvin M. LILE, Patties' Gap, $10.

After a few days visiting relatives Mrs. H.M. DELIUS and son Clinton returned to their home in Harriman Monday.

Among the lucky parties to receive increase in pensions are M.F. MILLICAN, Rockwood, $24; Mary A. HESTER, Kreis, $8; Christian MILLER, Harriman $10; Calvin M. LILE, Patties' Gap, $10.

Union X Roads.  Mr. and Mrs. J.M. GRUBB visited their son, John GRUBB, of Lenoir City, Saturday.

Union X Roads.  Mrs. W.A. HARVEY, of Cave Creek visited her mother, Mrs. MAYS, who has been on the sick list for the past week.

D'Armond Dots.  Mr. Jesse MARTIN and wife, who have been visiting Mrs. MARTIN'S father, Mr. HARMON, at Cranetown, returned home Monday.

The East Tennessean, Kingston, Saturday, 29 Dec 1900, Vol. 35, No. 22.

From Harriman.  Mr. Lon SMITH, a 'ostler for the H. & N. R.R. and Miss Fannie TIPTON, a sister of Capt. Tom TIPTON, Kingston's efficient marshal, were joined in the holy bonds of matrimony at the West House on Sewanee street, on Christmas even, J.J. NEWPORT, Esq., officiating in that dignified, Chesterfield-like manner peculiar to the Judge.

Licensed to Wed.  W.D. MURRAY to Mollie CLOWER, Sam HARVEY to Bertha RANDALS, John L. TAYLOR to Samantha F. TAYLOR, L.M. SMITH to Fannie TIPTON, Reuben SMITH to Lula McDONALD, J.R. DUGGAR to Becca Lee EDGEMAN, Luke KIMBROUGH to Lizzie SILAS, T.N. DURHAM to Alice WILLIAMS, Jackson CLOUGH to (paper torn), John PURDY to (torn) BRANDHAM, James HUSKIN to Fannie FERGUSON, A.N. GLASS to Cordilia THATCHER, John WARD to Mattie WESTER.

James MILLER, son of Jeff MILLER, the liveryman, who has been serving as a soldier in the Philippines has returned home.

Mr. Richard LADD, ex sheriff of Roane county, and his brother Louis of Texas, are here visiting friends.

Mrs. Anna EVANS is spending the week with her father-in-law P.W. EVANS.

Homer HORNSBY, of Euche, spent Xmas with his grand-father, Mr. B.M. HORNSBY.

Jack the little son of Mr. A.J. CHILDRESS, is ill with fever.

Mr. W.M. FRENCH and wife of Knoxville, are visiting his father-in-law, County Court Clerk J.C. POPE.

Robert INGRAM, of Loudon county, was visiting the family of his brother Sheriff INGRAM, at this place Thursday.

The East Tennessean, Kingston, Saturday, 23 Mar 1901, Vol. 35, No. 34

M. Pat ISHAM and Miss Laura COOPER, daughter of Joseph COOPER, were married in this city last Sunday, J.J. NEWPORT, Esq. officiating.  A slight tinge of romance was added to the marriage by the ceremony being performed in the middle of Sewannee St. in front of Esq. NEWPORT's residence, after which the happy couple drove to the groom's father's Mr. W.F. ISHAM, in the country two miles, for dinner, and greatly suprised the old folks at home.

Born to Capt. and Mrs. John W. STAPLES, a son, on St. Patrick's day in the morning.

J.H. LLEWELLYN and his charming daughter Miss Josie of Wartburg, were in Kingston Monday.

Mr. Walter SAVAGE and Miss Hattie JENKINS have assumed the congenial ties of married felicity; have united in wedlock.  Esq. WARD performing the sacred ties.

The East Tennessean, Kingston, Saturday, 6 Dec 1902, Vol. 39, No. 16.
This issue comes from the Roane County Heritage Commission archives.

Marrying seems to be much in evidence in this section and C.W. BROWN, Esq., seems to be the marryingest Magistrate in the burgh,--Last Sunday--wet as is was,--he tied matrimonial knot that made Mr. P.H. JOHNSON and Miss Ella THOMPSON, one and on Monday he made one being Mr. John B. OWENS and Miss Matilda HALL, who John had won.
 

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 17 May 1900, Vol. XX, No. 12.

Local Paragraphs.  Married. -- Sunday morning last at the residence of the bride's parents.  Mr. and Mrs. Henry TAYLOR, Mr. Sevier WALLACE and Miss Mamie TAYLOR were united in marriage, Rev. J.H. GROSSELOSE officiating.  On a few friends of the family were present.

Mrs. Jemima RUMMAGE, of Eureka, celebrated her 82nd birthday last Thursday.  her grandchildren gave her a pleasant surprise and came with a number of presents for her.  Grandma, as she is called by all who know her, is another of twelve children, among, them H.H. RUMMAGE, of Rockwood.  Although she is getting on in years she is still in very good health.

"Marrried."  Mr. Chas. HILL and Miss Ruth DAVIS, worthy young people of Harriman, were married on the Clinch River bridge on Sunday by Judge P.W. EVANS.  The groom is a son of Capt. I.A. HILL and has charge of the latters store on Morgan street, and the bride is the daughter of Col. L. Tyler DAVIS, and both are deservedly popular among their large circle of friends.  They are receiving hearty congratulations and good wishes even though they stole a march on the acquaintances. -- Harriman Record.

"Marriage License." R.L. DANIELS to Nellie PLANT -- Chattanooga News.  The above tells the story, as we said last week a certain young man from Rockwood wound not return from the May Festival alone.  The wedding took place in Chattanooga Wednesday of last week and the young couple will make Rockwood their future home.  The many friends of the groom, who is a Rockwood boy, unite with the Times-Republican in extending  congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. R.L. DANIELS.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 14 Jun 1900, Vol. XX, No. 16.

"Johnson-Smith."  Wednesday evening at 6 o'clock, in the parlor of the Upton Inn, Miss Bessie JOHNSON, of Half Moon Island, and Dr. T.L. SMITH, of Cleveland, were married.  The ceremony was performed by Rev. D.G. RILE, of Cleveland, and was witnessed by a number of the relatives and friends of the contracting parties.  Miss JOHNSON is a charming young lady, having frequently visited her aunt, Mrs. G.B. JOHNSON in this city.  Dr. SMITH is a rising young physician of Cleveland.  The happy young couple left at 7:25 for points east for an extensive wedding tour.  They will reside in Cleveland -- Sweetwater Telephone.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 Jul 1900, Vol. XX, No. 19.

Local Paragraphs.  John SNOW and Miss Kate CALDWELL drove to Kingston Sunday to Kingston Sunday last and while there prepared a little suprise for their many friends by getting married.  The Times-Republican unites with their many friends in extending congratulations.

"GROSECLOSE-REGESTER."  James Henry GROSECLOSE, Catherine Florence REGESTER, Married, Wednesday, June twenty-seventh, Nineteen hundred, Spring City, Tennessee.  The above announcement was received at this office a few days ago and was not unlooked for.  Mr. GROSECLOSE is the pastor of the M.E. Church, South, at this place and numbers his friends by his acquaintances.  The bride is one of Spring City's most charming young ladies and will be quite an addition to the church and social circles of Rockwood.  The Times-Republican extends heartiest congratulations to the happy young couple.

We called on papa J.C. OWINGS Monday morning and found him able to work.  The young lady who arrived at his home last Thursday morning while being quite autocratic(?) her way, realizes that if papa doesn't work baby won't wear any shoes, therefore [faded] working hard and mother and babe are doing well.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 Oct 1900, Vol. XX, No. 32.

"Local Paragraphs."  Born to Mr. and Mrs. John SWARTSZMAN on Monday last a fine bouncing boy.  Mother and babe are doing nicely and John, well he bears the title of papa with dignity.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 22 Nov 1900, Vol. XX, No. 39.

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Otis HAMBY, one day last week, a fine large boy.  Mother and son are both doing well, and Otis is only hitting the high places.

"Bacon-McDaniel."  Sunday evening last at 3 o'clock at the home of the bride's parents near King's Creek, Mr. Bart BACON and Miss Maggie McDANIEL were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  Elder C.B. REYNOLDS of the Christian church performed the ceremony.  Immediately after the ceremony the young couple drove to the home of the grooms mother in Rockwood where a splendid supper had been prepared.  They left Sunday night on the vestibule for Washington, Richmond and Baltimore.  Mr. BACON is the popular freight agent for the Q & C at the point, and is a young man of splendid business qualifications.  He numbers his friends by his acquaintances.  The bride, is the daugther of Mr. J.N. McDANIEL a well to-do farmer int he King's Creek neighborhood and is well known here, having many friends who wish her and her husband a happy and prosperous married life.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 20 Dec 1900, Vol. XX, No. 43.
"Local Paragraphs."  Wm. B. BROWN and Miss Amy JONES were married at Cardiff last Sunday.

Dr. T.N. EBLEN, of Tyner, formerly of Paw Paw, and Miss Delia SHORT of Rockwood, were married at the home of Mrs. Howard NILES, No. 229 Rossville Ave. Chattanooga.  Rev. T.R. HARDEN, of Ringgold, Ga. officiated.  The many freinds of the happy couple in this county extended congratulations.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 7 Feb 1901, Vol. XX, No. 49.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Sam HINDS Monday night last a fine 12 pound girl.  Mother and child are doing well.

Local Paragraphs.  Married:  At ten o'clock Sunday morning last on the Emory river bridge at Harriman, Miss Mollie OWINGS and Mr. Dorsey KINDRED, Rev. E.J. BALDWIN officiating.  The bridge and groom are popular young people and belong to two of Roane County's oldest and most respected families.  We extend congratulations and well wishes.

Local Paragraphs.  Mrs. A.P. THOMPSON, of Glenalice recently became the possessor of two old family heirlooms, an old-fashioned spinning wheel and chest.  They originally belong to her great-grandmother and have been in the family for more than a hundred years.  They came into her possession at the heath of her mother, Mrs. DYKE.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Mar 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 4.

Glenalice.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. H.B. HICKEY a fine ten pound girl, Mother and child are both doing well and H.B. is all smiles, it being the first one.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 Apr 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 5.
 
Harriman.  March 31.-- A beautiful wedding was solemnized at St. Andrew's Episcopal church in this city, March 27, the contracting parties being Mr. Rob Kent CHAPMAN, of Cincinnati, and Miss Edythe TODD, Harriman, Rev. KILHEFFER officiating.  The bridal party entered to the strains of "Lohengrin Chorus," sung by Mrs. FLEENER, Miss LUTZ, G. BECHTEL and Dr. MORGAN.  The bride was a dream of loveliness, wearing a silk gown en traine, bridal veil caught up with orange blossoms, and carrying bride's roses.  The maid of honor, Miss Evelyn TODD, looked most charming American Beauties, Miss Lula CHAPMAN, sister of the groom, entered with Mr. Beene McCALLIE.  She was most stylish in a gown of mousseline de sole.  Miss Roxie BROWN with Mr. S.S. CAMPBELL, looked lovely in white organdie, carrying Mareschal Neil roses.  The bridal couple left for New York on their honeymoon.  At home in Cincinnati after May 1, 1901.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 11 Apr 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 6.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. FOWLER on Saturday last a fine boy.  The mother and child are doing nicely, and Ham says that if the younger GROSECLOSE persists in breaking into the mayority race that he will resign in favor of his son and let the young bloods fight it out.

Local Paragraphs.  Married at the home of the parents of the bride below town on Thursday evening last, Mr. A.T. GRANT and Mis Dicie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar THOMPSON.  The young couple have gone to house keeping in the Jackson cottage on Chestnut Hill.

Local Paragraphs.  Charles LITTLE is rejoicing over the arrival of a daughter at his home Monday.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Walter JOHNSON, Thursday, a son; and to Mr. and Mrs. P.R. BROWN a daughter.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 18 Mar 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 7.

Announcements are out for the marriage of Mr. A.R. HUMES and Miss ELDRIDGE, of Chattanooga, which will take place, April 24.  Mr. HUMES is in the employ of the Roane Iron Co. at this place, and is very popular in society and business circles.  He and his bride will be welcomed to Rockwood.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 11 Jul 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 19.

Two of a Kind.  There are others to follow.  Wednesday of last week, Ed GEORGE, nephew of Dr. J.E. GEORGE and Miss Minnie ARP were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  The ceremony was performed by Squire W.C. HILL at the pond on Kingston pike.  The young couple are receiving the congratulations of their many friends.

Monday night of this week Mr. Fred HAGGARD and Miss Kate CROWDER stole a march on their friends.  After supper they went out presumably to take a walk and were met near the Presbyterian church by 'Squire W.C. HILL.  They took their positions on the church steps and in a short time the genial 'Squire pronounced the ceremony that made them man and wife.  They went tot he Mourfield and registered where they are now receiving congratulations of their many friends and relatives.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 25 Jul 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 21.
 
Diamond-Vance.  Monday night of this week Miss Mary E. VANCE who has been the charming guest of Mr. and Mrs. A.R. HUMES gave her hostess and her many friends a complete surprise.  In company with Mr. John J. DIAMOND they went to the residence of Rev. W.A. ERVIN, where in a short impressive ceremony the words that made them man and wife were spoken.  They are rooming at the Regester House on Front street.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 1 Aug 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 22.

Married in Rockwood.  Miss Esther VANCE, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John C. VANCE of East Fourth street, was married in Rockwood on Monday evening to Mr. John J. DIAMOND, by Rev. Mr. IRWIN.  Miss VANCE went to Rockwood last week to visit Mrs. HUMES, formerly Miss Hattie ELDRIDGE of this city.  Mr. DIAMOND visited her there and they decided to marry at once instead of prolonging an engagement which has been known for some time, but only to their intimate friends.  Mr. DIAMOND is a Vermont man who came her with the first Vermont regiment during the Spanish American war, and made many friends in this city.  The bride is very young, is well know and has a large circle of friends to wish her happiness in her marriage. -- Chattanooga News.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 8 Aug 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 23.
 
 

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Hugh TAYLOR, Friday last, a fine ten pound girl.  Mother and babe are both doing well.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 10 Oct 1901, Vol. XXI, No. 32.

Local Paragraphs.  John COLLETT and Miss Maggie MARTIN, both of Cardiff, were married Sunday.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. J.C. TURNER, Thursday last a fine 11 pound girl.  Mother and babe are both doing well and Jim seems to be about a foot taller.

The Times-Republican, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 13 Feb 1902, Vol. XXI, No. 50.

Local Paragraphs.  Rumor has it that about a month ago two of Rockwood's young people were married and kept the matter a secret until a day or two ago, when the immediate families found it out.  They say "murder will out(?)" so will weddings and here goes, congratulations are in order for Henry MYERS and wife, nee Miss Alice UNDERWOOD.  We know we are a good guesser.

Renfro Items.  Sunday morning at the home of the brides parents, at Pine Orchard Walter KIMBROUGH, of this place and Miss Ada CRAIG were married.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 2 Jul 1903, Vol. XXIII, No. 17.

Drips-Thompson Nuptials.  Last night at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. STITH in Rossville, Mrs. STITH'S sister, Miss Lilly May THOMPSON was united in marriage to Mr. David E. DRIPS, of Conemaugh, Pa.  It was a beautiful home wedding witnessed by many friends of the contracting parties.  At 8:30 o'clock to the strains of Mednelssohn's orchestra, the bridal party entered the spacious hall, which was arranged for the ceremony.  They came from opposite sides, two tiny flower girls, leading the way, followed by the bride upon the arm of Mr. J.C. STITH, while from the other side came the groom with his best man Mr. BRUCE, and the party was met at the improvised altar by Rev. W.C. ROBERSON of Christ church, who used the beautiful marriage serivce of the Episcolpal church, joining the lives of the young couple before him.  The bride was attired in an exquisite gown of white organdie over sill while from her head was draped beautiful veil.  She is who is ever charming and petite was unusually lovely in her wedding robe, and she carried a chatelain boquet of bride roses and sweet peas.  Little Misses Ruth MEE, a niece of the bride, and Ivy SHEPHERD, the flower girls, wore exquisite little frocks of white organdie.  After the ceremony felicitation were exchanged and a reception of much pleasure followed.  Punch was dispensed at a pretty table in the hall and elegant refreshments were served in the dining room from the beautifully decorated table.  Saffer's orchestra rendered music throughout the evening.   The many elegant presents were displaced in a side room, and they called forth much admiration from the guests.  Mr. and Mrs. DRIPS will leave tomorrow for the home of the groom and they will make their future home there.  This marriage takes away one of the most charming and lovely girls of this city and the best wishes of scores of friends go with her to her new home.  Mr. DRIPS is a young man prominent in railroad circles in Conemaugh.-- Chattanooga Times.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Jan 1904, Vol. XXIII, No. 46.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. James FRITTS, a son, on Sunday last.

"Two Hearts Beat As One."  Married at the residence of W.W. McNEAL of this place, Mr. W.J. LONG and Mrs. Annie E. PETREE.  Mr. LONG has always been a citizen of this county and for some time of Rockwood.  Mrs. LONG'S home was in Kansas City.  She came here and the marriage was solemized by Rev. A.A. FERGUSON on Sunday morning last.  We wish the happy couplea pleasant voyage o'er the matrimonial sea.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 Feb 1904, Vol. XXIII, No. 47.

Local Paragraphs.  Tom SWAGERTY is rejoicing over the arrival of a 11 pound boy at his home last Friday.
 
The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 18 Feb 1904, Vol. XXIII, No. 49.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. J.C. TURNER, Monday evening a fine 11 pound boy.  Mother and babe are doing nicely.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 3 Mar 1904, Vol. XXIII, No. 51.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Mr. Geo. WOODRUFF, of Rockwood, and Miss Pearl DISHONE, of Crab Orchard, were married Wednesday last.

Local Paragraphs.  Mr. Clarence STEPHENS and Miss Nell SOSSMAN, were married at the Christian Church Parsonage by the Pastor, Rev. A.A. FERGUSON, on Thursday night last.  Both young people are well and favorably known and number their friends by their acquaintances.  The Times unites with their many friends in extending congratulations.

Local Paragraphs.  Thursday afternoon last, at the M.E. Church parsonage, Rev. G.T. BYRD performed the marriage ceremony uniting Mr. Fred BAIRD and Miss Annie REYNOLDS.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. W.J. RICHARDS, superintendent of the mines for the Roane Iron Co., and the groomis the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. BAIRD.  Both young people are well known, and have the best wishes of a large circle of friends.  They are boarding at Mr. and Mrs. V.A. HEATH'S for the present.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frelyn LYMON(?) [torn] Saturday last, a fine nine and a half pound girl.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 10 Mar 1904, Vol. XXIII, No. 52.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Clyde SHADDEN, on Monday last, a fine baby boy.  Mother and babe are both doing nicely, and of course, Clyde has a big smile on his face.

Local Paragraphs.  Mr. and Mrs. R.F. SALYERS are the happy father and mother of a dainty baby girl whick arrived Sunday night.  We extend congratulations.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 24 Mar 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 2.

Married:--On Saturday last at the residence of W.A. COLLINS, the brother of the bride, Mr. Fred SECOR and Miss Minnie COLLINS were made husband and wife.  They are both good, honest, upright young people.  Rev. R.J. CORBETT performed the ceremony.  The happy couple have our congratulations.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 31 Mar 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 3.

A Bouncing Baby.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. H.V. TAUSCHER on Monday last, a fine 8 pound boy.  The mother and babe are doing fine.

Local Paragraphs.  Married:--Sunday afternoon last at the residence of 'Squire W.C. HILL, Mr. W.H. QUALLS and Miss Ella INGRAM, were united in marriage.  The bride is a daughter of Mr. Sam INGRAM, of Cardiff, and the groom is a prosperous young farmer.  Both young people have a large circle of friends who wish them a prosperous happy voyage o'er the matrimonial sea.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 5 May 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 8.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. S.E. GEORGE on Sunday morning last, a fine ten pound girl.  Mother and babe are doing nicely, and Papa Ed is all smiles.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 2 Jun 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 12.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ed CLAYTON, a fine 9 pound boy, Monday last.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 23 Jun 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 15.
 
Nicholas-Sanborn.  This morning at 11 o'clock at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. O. SANBORN, on Chamberlain avenue, Hon. J.L. NICHOLAS, one of Rockwood's most prominent attorneys, and Miss Anne W. SANBORN, were united in marriage, Rev. W.A. ERVIN, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiating.  The wedding was a quiet affair, none but a few intimate friends of the family being present.  The bride appeared unusually attractive, wearing an elegant going away gown of champagne voile over silk, with cream lace and elaborate applique trimming, with a chic brown straw chapeau daintly trimmed in blue forget-me-nots, and carrying a huge arm bouquet of bride's roses.  The parlors were profusely decorated with ferns, palms, sweet alyssum and Marshal Niel roses.  Immediately after the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. NICHOLAS took the fast mall for St. Louis, Mo., where they will spend a week at the World's Fair.  They will also visit Mr. NICHOLAS' brother at Springfield, Mo., but will be at home to their friends, at their residence on Chestunt Hill, after July 1st.  Mr. and Mrs. NICHOLAS number their friends by their acquaintances.  The groom is one of our leading attorneys, honorable, upright and a true christian gentlemen.  The bride has been for some time past one among the most popular teachers in our public schools, and belongs to one of our very best families.  The Times editor, family and staff, wish the happy couple the greatest success through life, and we feel that we but voice the sentiment of a very great majority of our citizens.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 30 Jun 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 16.
 
Local Paragraphs.  From the Knoxville Sentinel: Born Friday afternoon to Gen. and Mrs. Will D. WRIGHT, a daughter.  Mrs. Will D. WRIGHT, a daughter.  The newcomer weighs ten pounds and is a bright little one.  The general is today receiving the congratulations of friends.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 7 Jul 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 17.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles COLLETT, on Sunday last, a fine 12-pound girl.  Mother and babe are doing nicely.

Local Paragraphs.  Married--July 4th at the residence of the bride's father, Mr. James KNOX, Mr. Fred CATES, of Craborchard and Miss Annie KNOX were united in marriage, at 10 a.m., Rev. R.J. CORBIT, officiating.  The happy couple left on the noon train for Nashville over the Tennessee Central and will visit St. Louis Exposition before returning.  They will make their home at Craborchard.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 21 Jul 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 19.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jno. SCHNEIDL a fine large boy Wednesday of last week.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert GOLDSTON, Thursday evening last, a fine 12 pound boy.  Mother and babe are doing nicely and Bob says he will stand guard a few nights at least.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 28 Jul 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 20.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Mr. Robert THOMPSON and Miss Ada KELLY were united in the bonds of holy matrimony last Sunday morning at the parsonage of the M.E. Church by the pastor, G.T. BYRD.  We congratulate this young couple and wish them a long and happy life.  Mr. Robert THOMPSON is a prominent young man of Rockwood, and Miss KELLY is a beautiful young lady of the same place.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 Aug 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 21.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. J.A. SWAGERTY on Sunday July 24th a daughter.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Otis HAMBY at Rugby on Friday last a daughter.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 18 Aug 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 23.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. John COLLETT a fine large 8 pound boy Saturday morning last.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 8 Sep 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 26.

Local Paragraphs.  Mr. and Mrs. Sam ODOM are the pround parents of a little girl baby which arrived August the thirty-first.

Married.  On Sunday last at the home of the bride's parents, (the Mourfield Hotel) Mr. Charles M. JONES and Miss Sue BLACK were united in marriage Rev. G.T. BYRD officiating.  Mr. JONES is a young business man of Knoxville, and Miss BLACK is the daughter of Mr. J.A. BLACK and one of Rockwood's most attractive young ladies.  The happy couple left on the 3:30 Tennessee Central train for Knoxville Sunday evening, where they will spend a week or more at the home of the groom, and then take a trip to the St. Louis Fair.  The Times extends congratulations.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 22 Sep 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 28.

Married.  On last Wednesday at the home of H. RICHARDS, the uncle of the bride, Mr. Samuel IRISH, of Briceville, and Miss Mary SCHWARTZMAN were married.  The marriage ceremony was said by A.A. FERGUSON, of the Christian Church, and the happy couple left on the evening train.  We wish them the joys of a long and happy life.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 29 Sep 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 29.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles EAST of east Rockwood, on Wednesday of last week, a fine daughter.  Mother and babe are doing nicely.

Local Paragraphs.  Dr. and Mrs. J.E. NELSON, of Briceville, are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine 6 pound girl at their home Saturday last.

Steinwehr-Rex.  This, Wednesday, morning at 9-30 o'clock at the home of the parents of the bride, near Harriman, Mr. C.F. STEINWEHR, a prominent business man of Rockwood, and Miss Grace REX were united in marriage.  The wedding was a quiet home affair, only the immediate relatives and a very few friends being invited.  The happy couple left on the noon train for a ten days trip to the World's Fair, after which they will make their home in Rockwood, The Times extends congratulations.  Among those from Rockwood who attended the wedding were Mrs. O. STEINWEHR, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. WILSON, Mr. and Mrs. J.D. AVERY, Miss Mary STEINWEHR and Mrs. H.K. EVANS.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 6 Oct 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 30.
 
Estell's Valley.  Mr. James SMITH, of Briceville, and Miss L. KELSEN, of Roane County, were married here Saturday by Rev. P.E. MAYBERRY, a traveling minister.  We extend congratulations.

Byrd's Branch News Notes.  S.C. GALLAHER is all smiles.  It's a boy.  Mother and Babe are doing nicely and Sam is improving.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 13 Oct 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 31.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. W.H. JOSEPH, Thursday last, a fine 12 pound boy.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 27 Oct 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 33.

The Tarwater-Spears Wedding.  We clip the following from the Knoxville Daily Journal and Tribune, which we know the friends of our fellow townsman will be be interested in.  After November 1st Mr. and Mrs. TARWATER will be in Rockwood, where they will be complimented with several entertainments.  A warm welcome will be accorded the bride, whose friends have grown in number with each visit she has made to our town, and now as the wife of one of our most popular and best liked men she will be received with more pleasure than ever:
     "For the past month, since the announcement of the engagement of Miss Grace Kindrick SPEARS and Mr. Polk TARWATER, their wedding has been looked forward to as one of the most notable happenings of the season.
     "Because of the prominence of the bride and groom and the wide circle of their acquaintances their marriage has been a much discussed topic of conversation in society circles.  To witness the marriage ceremony, which was solemnized last evening at the residence of the bride's sister, Mrs. Will D. WRIGHT, there were gathered a number of relatives and friends from a distance and also present were about fifty of the most particular Knoxville friends of the happy couple.
     "General and Mrs. WRIGHT opened their house and each apartement was brillantly illuminated and decorated for the occasion.  After the guests were assembled at the appointed hour of the ceremony the bridal party descended the broad stairway of the main entrance hall to the strains of the beautiful wedding march, as played by Mrs. Carolyn ARNOLD, of Chattanooga.  The groom was attended by his best man, Mr. Thomas PETERMAN, of Rockwood.  The maid of honor was Miss Dorothy TARWATER, sister of the groom.  Miss SPEARS was given away by her brother, Mr. Alvin SPEARS, of Jasper.  As the officiating minister was Rev. Dr. ELLISON, of Oregon, the former pastor of the bride.
     "The bride's gown was a very exquisite white lace robe over white ciffon draping white taffeta silk.  Her veil was held in place by a coronet of orange blossoms and she carried a shower bouquet of white bride's roses and lillies of the valley, with maiden hair fern.  On the corsage was worn a magnificent sunburst [line illegible].
     "Miss TARWATER, as maid of honor, was gowned in an imported spangled net robe over green silk.  The sequins were in the jeweled effect of the pastel shades.  Her bouquet was of white chrysanthemums.
     "Mrs. WRIGHT received in a gown of light blue silk crepe de chine with trimmings of white and cream lace medallions.  Diamond ornaments.
     "After the tendering of congratulations to the groom and felicitations to the bride, the guests were privileged to view the elegant gifts, which were displayed in the Dutch smoking room.  The drawing room and library were decorated with palms and cut flowers as were also the hallways.  The chandeliers were twined with smilax and tied with white tulle and white satin ribbons.  A very pretty idea was the forming of the intians "S. and T."  in the garlands of smilax above the central chandeliers.
     "In the floral arrangements the white and green prevailed throughout the entire home.  Cosmos, roses and carnations were used in the parlors with masses of waving palms.
     "When the folding doors of the dining room were drawn the most beautiful table was disclosed.  General and Mrs. WRIGHT have a very beautiful home, but of the many apartments perhaps the dining room is mostly universally admired.  The furnishings are the dark Flemish oak, very richly carved.  For the wedding the table was left uncovered save for the use of a center-piece and doylies of white lace, bought by the bride in Amsterdam, on her percent foreign tour.
     "A large bowl of white chrysanthemums was placed in the center of the table and at the diagonal corners were silver dishes with huge bunches of luscious white grapes tied with white tulle.  Silver candelabra burned white wax tapers and silver dishes with green and white mints ornamented the table.  Over the table the chandelier was twined with smilax and tulle and was made to form a belle with the clapper of white carnations.  In serving the collation the green and white color scheme was carried out with pretty effect.
     "The decorations throughout the home were very artistically planned and were desiged by Miss Kitty CLEAGUE.  A very unique idea instead of the conventional wedding cake with its favors was to have the bridal bouquet formed a number of small bouquets and when the bride tossed her bouquet into the midst of her girl friends the several lucky pieces--the thimble, ring, needle and button--were found to be hidden in the flowers."
The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 3 Nov 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 34.

Local Paragraphs.  Mr. and Mrs. J.W. ANGEL went down to Spring City Tuesday morning to be present at the wedding of Mr. ANGELS sister, Elizabeth, to the Rev. J.W. BOWLING, of Dayton.  They were married at 7:00 a.m. and took the morning train for St. Louis, accompanied by Mr. Eugene HALEY and sister.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest SHADDEN a daughter on Saturday last.  Ernest is stepping higher, walking faster, smiling more gladly that we have seem him for some time past.  Mother and babe are doing well.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 10 Nov 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 35.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. S.Z. ROSE on Monday last, a son.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 17 Nov 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 36.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. S.Z. ROSE on Monday last, a son.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 1 Dec 1904, Vol. XXIV, No. 38.

Dietzen-Wasson.  A beautiful home wedding was that of Miss Adah Pearl WASSON and Mr. Charles DIETZEN, of Chattanooga which was celebrated at the residence of the bride's parents.  Dr. and Mrs. J.C. WASSON, at Rhea Springs on Wednesday Nov. 23rd.  At eleven o'clock an ante-nuptial wedding breakfast was served the bridal party in the dining room where the color motif was pink and white, superb pink chrysanthemums with smilax and ferns were the floral decorations while the pink and white color scheme appeared in each of the seven courses served.  At one o'clock genuine sothern hospitality was dispensed to all the wedding guests at the elegant home of Mr. and Mrs. Chapman WASSON, where an elaborate dinner in many courses was faultlessly served.  The marriage ceremony which was performed by Rev. Father TOBIN at three o'clock, took place in the parlor which was tastefully decorated in the nuptial colors, green and white.  The Medelssohn Wedding March, played by Miss Mayme DAVIS, announced the approach of the bridal party, which was led by little Miss Blanche WASSON, who wore a dainty blue frock and carried a basket of white flowers and a silver plate bearing the wedding ring.  She was followed by Misses Martha DAVIS and Gay WASSON, who were beautifully gowned in white organdy and carried sheafs of white chrysanthemums.  The bride and groom came in together, and Lange's "Flower Song" was played during the taking of the vows.  The bride was handsome in an artisitic gown of white silk, and beautiful bridal veil fastened with a pearl and diamond brooch, gift of the groom.  She carried a shower bouquet of Bride's roses and orange blossoms.  In an adjoining room many magnificent presents were displayed, which attested the popularity  of both bride and groom.  Mr. and Mrs. DIETZEN left the same evening for an extended wedding journey through Florida and Cuba.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 26 Jan 1905, Vol. XXIV, No. 45.

Married.  Mr. Sam A. BREAZEALE and Miss Lou Baird RALSTON, at the residence of the bride, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. STUART, of the Christian church officiating.  Both of the contracting parties are well known.  Mr. BREAZEALE is a member of the well known law firm of STAPLES & BREAZEALE and the bride is one of Harriman's sweetest and most popular young ladies.  The happy couple drove over to Kingston after the ceremony, where an old-time southern welcome was awaiting them.  They were guests of the BREAZEALE House during their stay and a large number of young society people called to pay their respects and extend congratulations.  Mr. and Mrs. BREAZEALE will shortly take up their residence in Harriman, where they will make their future home--Kingston East Tennesseean.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 2 Feb 1905, Vol. XXIV, No. 46.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. W.T. FRITTS, a son, Mother and babe are doing nicely.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. W.A. QUALLS last week, a son.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 15 Feb 1905, Vol. XXIV, No. 48.
 
Population Increasing.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jack HESTER Monday, February 27, a son.  To Mr. and Mrs. Dave TAYLOR, same date a girl.  To Mr. and Mrs. Tom ELLIS same date a son.  To Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. SCHOLL same date a daughter.  These are the returns so far as we have been able to get them.  The complete returns may change results considerably, but as far as the above is concerned it is an even break.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 30 Mar 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 2.
 
Rockwood, R.F.D. No. 3  Born to Mr. and Mrs. W.T. BLAKE on the 26th a son.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 13 Apr 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 4.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. McPHERSON a fine girl Monday morning.  Mother and babe are doing well.

The following invitation has been received by a number of our citizens: Mr. William SMITH requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of his sister, Estelle WALKER, to Mr. James Leonard MEE, on Wednesday evening, April twelfth nineteen hundred and five, at eight o'clock, 46 Thirty-fifth stereet, Chicago.  At home after May 1, Rockwood, Tenn.  Miss SMITH is well and favorable known here, having been the guest of Mrs. H. FOWLER at different times.  Mr. MEE, the Roane Iron company's chemist is very popular among the young people.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 27 Apr 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 6.

Ingram-Martin.  On Sunday last Mr. Robert INGRAM and Miss Myra MARTIN, both of Cardiff, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  'Esq. Adam DERRICK, officiating.  Mr. INGRAM is a prominent young man and is a brother of Sheriff T.F. INGRAM.  The bride is the beautiful daughter of Mr. Bud MARTIN.  Both young people are very popular.  Sheriff INGRAM and daughter Miss Lillie, of Kingston, were the only relatives who witnessed the ceremony.  We wish them success and happiness through life.

The following announcement has been received by a number of our citizens during the past week.  Mrs. Sarah E. STANLEY announces the marriage of her daughter, Bessie, to Mr. George Edwards SYLVESTER, on Wednesday the nineteenth of April, one thousand nine hundred and five, at Winthorp, Massachusetts.  At Home Rockwood, Tennessee.  Mr. SYLVESTER is a civil engineer and is well known here.  He is associated with Mr. W.J. RICHARDS in the manufacture of a patent mine water car.  He and his bride have arrived in the city and are rooming at Mrs. J.T. SHELLEY'S on Rockwood avenue.  The many friends of Mr. SYLVESTER wish them success and happiness.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 4 May 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 7.

Coalfield, Tenn.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. Edgar FOSTER on Thursday April 27th a fine ten pound girl.  Mother and babe are doing nicely.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 11 May 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 8.

"Rockwood, R.F.D. No. 3"  Born to C.L. SPERLING and wife on May 7th, a girl.

Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. H.M. TAYLOR, May 4th, a fine boy.  Mother and babe are doing nicely.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 18 May 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 9.
 
Local Paragraphs.  [Torn] Jas. LEE, of Rockwood, and Miss [torn]ina POSTON, of Jamestown, were married Tuesday of last week at the residence of 'Squire A.M. DERRICK, the genial 'Squire officiated.

Idlewild.  Mrs. Jesse HALL went to Chattanooga Sunday and will remain there until after the wedding of her daughter, Nannie, which occurs May 18th.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 15 Jun 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 13.

Kindrick-Benson.  Mr. George KINDRICK, of Soddy, and Miss Kate BENSON, of Dayton, were married, at the home of her parents, Capt. and Mrs. W.B. BENSON, on Wednesday last.  Dr. KINDRICK has many friends here who wish him much happiness and congratulate him on winning so fair a bride.
 
The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 29 Jun 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 15.
 
Miss Hill A June Bride.  Marriage of A Popular Couple Yesterday Afternoon.  The residence of Mr. and Mrs. I.A. HILL on Morgan street was the scene of a pretty home wedding at 3:30 yesterday afternoon when their daughter, Miss Mattie Pearl, became the bride of Robert Bryan CASSELL, Rev. A.A. FERGUSON, of Rockwood, in his usual impressive manner pronounced the marriage ceremony.  The wedding proved quite a surprise to a large circle of friends of the contracting parties, and was a quiet home affair only the members of the bride's family and one or two intimate friends being present.  Immediately after the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. CASSELL were driven to the Junction where they took the Knoxville train for their bridal tour, and were well on their way before the fact that they were married became generally known.  Their tour will include the cities of Norfolk, New York, Buffalo Niagra Falls and other Eastern points of interest.  Upon returning to Harriman they will begin housekeeping in the Burt Cottage on Cumberland street, which was purchased by Mr. CASSELL a few weeks since, pending the erection of a handsome residence on the adjoining lots.  Miss HILL is a young lady of fine traits and culture.  She is universally popular in social circles and numbers her friends in Harriman only by the population of the city.  Mr. CASSELL is the junior member of the law firm of BROWN & CASSELL and is a gentleman of sterling worth and ability.--Harriman Record.  Miss HILL is a fair daughter of Roane's oldest and best families, and is well known in Rockwood, having been a most popular visitor in our city several times; and, as to know her is to love her, she has many warm friends here who wish her a life of joy and happiness."

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 3 Aug 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 20.

Owings-Roberts.  The many of Miss Olive OWINGS and Capt. Ed ROBERTS were very much surprised at the wedding which took place at six o'clock Monday morning at Oak Circle, the pretty surburban home of the bride; the happy couple leaving on the six-thirty train for her future home, Enid, Oklahoma.  Capt. ROBERTS has been a resident of Oklahoma for several years and holds a responsible and very lucrative position with the Denver and Enid Gulf Railroad Co.  He is a thoroughly honorable, capable young man and no doubt will make his mark in the business world.  He is the only son of Mr. and MRs. I.A. ROBERTS, who randk among Rockwood's most substantial and highly respected citizens.  Miss Olive OWINGS is well known as one of Roane county's most beautiful young ladies, possessing a charming personality, and numbers her friends only by her acquaintances.  She is the youngest daughter of General F.D. OWINGS, and comes of one of the oldest and best familes of East Tennessee.  The marriage ceremony was pronounced by the Rev. A.A. FERGUSON, pastor of the Christian church, of which Miss OWINGS is a devoted member, she was also one of the most popular members of the Monday Club and Smart Set, a church and social organization.  THe bride was unusally handsome attired in a dark blue silk coat suit(?) white embroidered waist, and a chic little blue milan straw continental hat.  In spite of the early morning hour and secrecy of the wedding quite a number of friends were at the station to bestow an abundance of congratulations, good wishes and rice on the happy and popular couple, whom we regret very much to lose as residents of our city, but wish for them a long, happy and prosperous life.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 10 Aug 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 21.

Our Young Photographer.  The home of Mr. and Mrs. C.F. STEINWEHR was made supremely happy Monday by the arrival of a fine nine pound baby boy.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 14 Sep 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 26.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Born to Mr. and Mrs. James L. DODD on Friday last a fine 12-1/2 pound boy.  Mother and babe are doing nicely, and it is expected that Jim will be able to go to work in a week.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 21 Sep 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 27.
 
Local Paragraphs.  Married.--Tuesday evening of last week, Mr. Tobias THAYER, of Evansville, Ind., and Miss Mattie ABSTON, daughter of Mr. L.F. ABSTON, were married.  Mr. THAYER, who is in the employ of the Cresant Paving Company, of Evansville, left Wednesday for that city and Mrs. THAYER will leave in a couple of weeks.

Local Paragraphs.  A Daughter--Born to Mr. and Mrs. T.W. DAY, an eleven pound girl, on Sunday last.  Babe and mother are doing nicely.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 9 Nov 1905, Vol. XXV, No. 34.

Local Paragraphs.  Married:--At the residence of Mrs. William BURNS, Saturday November the fourth, Mr. John TAYLOR, of Jamestown, and Miss Mary WELLS of Crossville, Esquire Adam DERRICK officiating.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 13 Sep 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 34.

Romance of the War.  Cuban Girl Who Was Brought to Tennessee by Gen. Harvey HANNAH'S Mother.  Geo. M. MANN in Nashville American.  The steamer Whitney left Havana harbor April 6, 1899, for Tampa, Fla.  The boat was advertised to leave to 12 m.  but did not leave until 6 p.m.  The delay was caused by the late arrival of the Fourth Virginia Volunteer Infanty.  A government official had secured transportation on the Whitney for the Virginia regiment.  There were also several squads of Ohio soldiers returning home on the vessel.  The steamer was anchored in the bay and all passengers were brought to the Whitney in big row boats and small tugs.  I was with the returning Ohio solders and was standing on the upper deck of the vessel watching the landing of the delayed Virginians, when I noticed a little Cuban girl in a row boat, accompanied by a lady and an oarsman.  The little girl was clapping her hands and throwing kisses to some one on board the steamer.  An American lady who was standing near me was waving her handkerchief at the little girl while tears were rolling down her cheeks.  When the Cuban girl and the Amercian lady met on board the steamer they hugged and kissed each other and both were weeping--an unusual sight--an American woman and a Cuban girl fondly embracing each other and both shedding tears.  What did it mean?  The lady was Mrs. McFERRIN of Oliver Springs, Tenn.  Her son, Col. Harvey H. HANNAH, was Lieutenant Colonel in the Fourth Tennessee and commanded a detachment at Sancti Spiritus, Cuba.  Mrs. McFERRIN had been visiting her son.  The Fourth Tennessee was stationed at Sancti Spiritus and Mrs. McFERRIN occupied a tent in the camp.  She was now returning tot he United States on board the Whitney.  The little girl's name was Lorena Marie Lacarada PARDRONE.  She was the daughter of a Cuban patriot.  Her home was at Sancti Spiritus (City of Holy Spirits.)  Mrs. McFERRIN told me that when she arrived at her son's quarters at the camp of the Fourth Tennessee regiment at Sancti Spiritus she "found this sweet, sad-faced child in the camp."  Through an interpeter she learned that the little girl's father was a Cuban soldier who died from the effects of a wound that he received in battle; that soon after the soldier who died from the effects of a wound that he received in battle; that soon after the father's death her mother became seriously ill.  Lorena went to the soldiers to get a candle--the light of fate--fer her dying mother, but when she returned with the candle her poor mother was dead.  Mrs. McFERRIN became interested at once in the child and tenderly helped the little orphan and did all she could to relieve her distress.  Lorena soon began to love the kind American woman and Mrs. McFERRIN loved the Cuban dearly.  Love begets love.  She wanted to adopt her, and as Lorena had no home she shared her tent with her for two months.  On March 29 Mrs. McFERRIN left the camp of the Fourth Tennessee, taking Lorena with her.  She was going with her adopted child to her Tennessee home.  At that date before leaving Cuba one had to go to the board of health and get a vaccination certificate.  Mrs. McFERRIN did not learn of this until she arrived at Havana the morning of the day she was to leave on the steamer.  Her vessel would leave at noon.  She went at once with Lorena to the health office and was told that the child could not leave for the United States until she was vaccinated.  Mrs. McFERRIN was exempt, having been vaccinated just before coming to Cuba.  Tickets had been purchased for passage on the steamer Whitney and the arrangement for their departure had been made in such a way that it could not possibly be postponed without considerable additional expense and great inconvenience to others.  The boat was soon to leave, and the Cuban girl who had learned to love this kind American woman, could not leave because she had not been vaccinatie.  What was the poor woman to do?  "It was a trying hour Indexed," said Mrs. McFERRIN.  Lorena learned of their predictament, and fearing that she would be permanently separated from her kind friend, trembled with emotion, saying in Spanish, "Do not leave me!  Please do not leave me!"  The situation was explained to the officer in charge of the health office, with an earnest appeal to give Lorena a good health certificate, as she had not beed exposed to small pox.  "No, she must be vaccinated; and she cannot be vaccinated until office hours, 2 to 4 p.m.," was the stern reply.  This would be two hours after the departure of the steamer.  Mrs. McFERRIN learned of a mission home in Havana.  She hurried with Lorena to the home.  Here arrangements were made to have the child vaccinated and remain there until she could be sent for.  It was all made clear to Lorena and Mrs. McFERRIN bade her an affectionate farewell and hurried to her steamer, not expecting to see her again for several weeks.  That dear little orphan girl should not have been separated from her loving protector.  We sometimes find foolish rulings, with fools to execute them-fellows that will strain at a gnat and swallow a camel.  If the official who refused to issue a good health certificate to Lorean had been a broad-gauge man he would have ignored the fool rules, precedents and red tape and given her a good health certificate; and if that were impossible, if he had been a sympathetic and resourceful man--a man big enough for the place--he could have put the child in a big basket, covered her over with the stars and stripes, and had the basket and contents carried on board the steamer.  But all's well that ends well.  Fortunately the steamer was detained as stated above, and Lorena received a vaccination certificate in time to join her protector before her departure.  I shall never forget, and the passengers who witnessed their meeting and greeting will never forget, how this affectionate and appreciate Cuban child throw her little brown arms around Mrs. McFERRIN'S neck and shed tears of joy--tears that were more eloquent than words.  The above narrative was written in May, 1889, after my return from Cuba for an Ohio journal.  This summer I sent a copy of the narrative to Mrs. McFERRIN and wrote to her making some inquiries about the little, dark-eyed Cuban damsel.  The answer follows:
                                        Oliver Springs, Tenn., July 31, 1906.
"My Dear Mr. Mann:--Of course I remember you and have often wondered if I should ever again see any of those who came over from Cuba with us, and can assure you I was so glad to get the copy of the newspaper article you sent me.  "Yes, Lorena is still with me and she is considered one of the most beautiful girls in our village, and she is as good as she is beautiful.  Her devotion to me is truly lovely; but I will lose her now, as she recently married Mr. John C. WALKER, a corporal in the Tenth Infantry, United States Army.  So you see Lorena is 'under the flag of her lovely beloved America.'  "After I brought Lorena home, she said: 'Mama, America dead," (You know it was a late spring, and the trees were dead so for as the leaves are concerned especially to Lorena, coming from a tropical and always green island).  'No", I said, 'America is not dead, but sleeping.'  A few weeks later she ran into the house and said: 'Mama, America waking up, come and see,' and she pointed to the trees which had begun to put forth their green leaves.  "I do wish you could see her, Mr. MANN.  We would be glad to have you repay us a visit.  This is a beautiful wild country and you could find much to interest you; so just pack your trunk and come down.  We will give you a hearty welcome.  Come soon, as Lorena leaves in a few weeks for Chattanooga.  "My son, Colonel H. HANNAH [torn] of Tennessee I enclose you a photograph of Lorena.  It is not as good as it could be, but I send it to let you form some idea of how she looks.  Will send you a better picture as soon as we can have some taken.  Also send you a clipping from the Nashville Banner.  You will see by the engraving that I a veteran of two wars.  My husband wore the gray, my son wore the blue; and I thank God there is no South nor North; no West nor East, but one great America, and I pray it may be so forever.  "Hope you are well, and with best wishes for your success, I am you friend,              "Mrs. R.A. McFERRIN."

The newspaper clipping Mrs. McFERRIN enclosed in her letter gives some interesting facts about a recent reunion of the Confederate veterans.  One of the items Mrs. McFERRIN'S father, Hon. Geo. F. GERDING, came to this country in his early manhood.  He settled in New York, where he became one of the leading dry goods merchants of his time.  He was United States minister to Belgium and consul-general to Baden-Baden.  While in Germany he conceived the idea of establishing a colony in Tennessee.  He removed to Tennessee from New York in 1849, founded Wartburg, and brought to East Tennessee 20,000 German immigrants.  There was a good photograph of Mrs. McFERRIN printed with the article and the writer said: "Mrs. McFERRIN'S first husband was Maj. John H. HANNAH of the Nineteenth Confederate regiment, one of the most gallant soldiers of the Civil war.  After his death she married Dr. R.A. McFERRIN, a prominent physician of Oliver Springs."  Mrs. McFERRIN'S heart is in the right place.  She is a natural, sympathetic, patriotic woman-a womanly woman of generous impulses, who scatters sunshine whenever she goes.  Her husband wore the gray in 1861, and her son wore the blue in 1898.  And what an inspiring sight it was at the time of the Spanish-American war to see the grandson of General Grant and the grandson of General Lee marching side by side under the broad folds of Old Glory.  One who could look upon such a scene and not feel his blood quicken, must Indexed be a very poor specimen of American manhood or womanhood.  There are some superfical people people who pooh-pooh and try to belittle the Spanish-American war.  True, there were few battles fought and but little blood shed; and when you compare this war with the great struggle of 1861-5, it was a very brief affair.  But this brief war gave the Cubans their liberty--made them a free people--and it was instrumental in uniting our country.  And for these blessing every true American is thankful.  More than that, it united Lorena and John, an American boy and a Cuban girl.  And as I look into the future, I fancy that I can see somewhere in Sunny Tennessee a happy American home where an affectionate Cuban girl sings lullabies to little tots who are grewing to be like the good woman who adopted their mother when she was a little orphan girl.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 27 Sep 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 27.

Roddy-Pierson.  Saturday evening last at the residence of Jas. SMITH on the Kingston pike Lee RODDY and Miss Mary PIERSON were united in marriage, Squire A.T. GRANT officiating.  After the ceremony an excellent supper was served.  This was the Squire a first effort but those who were present say he did a good job.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 11 Oct 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 42.

Langworthy-Robbins.  Ralph LANGWORTHY and Miss Dell ROBBINS, two popular and well known young people, were married quietly last evening at the residence of Councilman and Mrs. V.S. GRIFFITH, on Third street.  Miss ROBBINS is a sister of Mrs. GRIFFITH.  The ceremony was performed by Judge W.J. KIRKPATRICK and only immediate relatives were present.  Mr. LANGWORTHY is interested in mining enterprises and has a host of friends.  His bride is a charming and vivacious young woman and is a native of Tennessee.  The young couple made no formal announcement of their intended marriage and their friends were pleasantly surprised.  Mr. and Mrs. LANGWORTHY will remain on Pennington street.  They will go to California for a visit within a few weeks.--Tucson (Ariz.) Citizen.  Miss ROBBINS, the bride, was formerly a resident of Rockwood and lived for some time at Kingston.  She has many friends here who extend congratulations and wish her much happiness.

The City in Brief.  Mr. Harry BROWN and Miss Maggie BALDWIN were married Saturday morning by Rev. C.C. MORRIS.  The bride and groom left on the morning train for Oakdale, where they will spend a few days.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 25 Oct 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 44.

Jerry HAGGARD arrived last evening from Bristol to be present at the TARWATER-HOWARD marriage which occured this morning.

Miss HOWARD An October Bride.  Wedded to Mr. Jack TARWATER At Ten O'Clock This Morning.  The Howard Home Artistically Decorated for the Occasion--Gifts Were Many and Handsome.  This morning at the elegant home of Mr. and Mrs. Sewell HOWARD the marriage of Miss Ava HOWARD and Mr. Jack TARWATER was solemnized.  The reception halls and library were artistically decorated with ferns and bride's roses.  In the drawing room, where the ceremony was performed, was in improvised altar, around which the bridal party was arranged.  While the guests were arriving Mr. Cap K. HILL of Harriman gave a program of choice nuptial music.  Promptly at 10 o'clock to the ever beautiful Lohengrin march, the bride and groom entered unattended.  Dr. A.A. FERGUSON was the officiating minister, performing the ceremony in an impressive manner.  While the vows were being said Mr. HILL played "O! Thou Sublimed Sweet Evening Star" and the Mendelssohn march while the bride and groom received congratulations.  A buffet luncheon was served in the dining room, where a color scheme of white and green prevailed.  The ice course was very attactive, being Cupids with drawn bows.  Mrs. TARWATER'S unusual beauty was enhanced by her wedding robes of messaline satin, made princess with empire lines and a bertha of rare rose point, which was caught with a handsome diamond brooch, the gift of the groom.  She carried a shower boquest of bride's roses and lilies of the valley.  Mr. TARWATER wore conventional morning dress.  The wedding gifts were unusually handsome, notable among them were a chest of silver, a tea service and generous checks.  Mrs. TARWATER'S traveling gown was a blue chiffon broadcloth, tailored, with hat harmonizing.  After their honeymoon trip spent in the East they will be at home in Bristol where Mr. TARWATER has large business interests.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 1 Nov 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 46.

The City in Brief.  Clay EDDE and Miss Annie ETTER were quietly married on Saturday evening, Oct. 27th, at 8 p.m. at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.C. ETTER, on Kingston avenue, A.T. GRANT, Esq. officiating.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 15 Nov 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 48.

Felts-Frytag.  Mr. Michael Angelo FELTS and Miss Lydia Deborah FRYTAG were married at the home of Mr. and Mrs. LOUDERMILK, near the Tennessee Central depot Saturday Nov. 3rd, A.T. GRANT, Esq., officiating.  The squire is making quite a record marrying folks.  This makes the 6th couple he has tied up since he has been in office, a little more than two months.

About the City.  Mr. Roscoe OWINGS and bride (nee Miss Annie LEEPER) arrived the latter part of last week from Knoxville and are now at home to friendsat their residence on Kingston avenue.  The marriage ceremony was performed in Knoxville on Monday, Nov. 5.  As an omen of good luck to the newly wedded couple they were met at the Rockwood depot upon their arrival by a span of snow white horses.  Mr. and Mrs. OWINGS, since reaching home have been the recipients of hearty congratulation and well wishes from their large circle of friends.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 29 Nov 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 48.

The News of Rockwood.  Mr. and Mrs. Robt. STRICKLAND are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine baby girl at their home one day last week.

The Rockwood Times, Rockwood, TN, Thursday, 6 Dec 1906, Vol. XXVI, No. 49.

Cardiff Notes."  Born to Porter VITETOE and wife on Dec. 4th, a boy.  Porter's friends are uneasy about the condition of his mind.